EVS Blog

  1. Worry-free Fishman Pickup Installation

    Karen

    How do you reassure the Assistant Concertmaster of the North Carolina Symphony that her violin will not be harmed by a temporary pickup for a rock show? In the case of Karen Galvin, she came into our shop and EVS founder Blaise Kielar showed her how to install a Fishman V-100 transducer in such a way that nothing touched the wood of her precious instrument.  She was so well heard in rehearsal that Blaise took one to the show for the viola of Katie Wyatt.
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  2. Picking out the Perfect Pickup

    There are a number of considerations you must take into account when selecting a pickup. Do you want a permanent pickup solution or something that is removable?  Is how quickly and easily the pickup can be installed and removed an important factor? Beyond volume, how important to you is tone reproduction? What are you willing to spend on a pickup?

    Pickup types for bowed string instruments can be divided into two main categories: permanent pickups (usually bridge replacements) and removable pickups. As we will see, there are several different types of removable pickup, which suit different performance needs.

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  3. Will a 5 string Violin Harm My Technique?

    Lots of violinists, and especially some younger players, seem drawn to the idea of a five-string electric violin. So many of our customers, especially parents buying an electric for violinists in their early teens, wonder if playing a five-string electric violin will be detrimental to the player's classical technique. We've even had a couple of adult beginners who had to trade in their five-string electric for a four string, when they were unable to find a teacher willing to take on a beginner who was starting with a five string.
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  4. Plugging In For the First Time

    Electric Violin Rig Setup Guide

    In order to play your instrument using an effects pedal and an amplifier you will need two ¼ inch instrument cables.  If you are not using an external effects processor, skip steps B and C.

    A) Locate the output jack of your new instrument.  Connect the instrument cable to your instrument.  This end of the cable may have a right angle connector, which can help to keep the cable out of your way while playing.  This, of course, depends on the placement of the output jack on your instrument.

    B) For use with effects processors, connect the other end of the cable into the INPUT jack of the effects processor.

    C) Connect one end of a second instrument cable to the OUTPUT jack on the effects processor.  If your effects processor has a stereo output (two outputs labeled L (mono) and R, use only the L/mono OUTPUT jack.

    D) Connect the other end of the instrument cable into the INPUT jack on your amplifier or mixing board.

    Once all your cables ends are connected, set the volume level on each to zero. Next, turn each piece of equipment on.  Turn up the master volume on the amplifier half way and the amp’s instrument channel up a third of the way.  Finally, raise the volume on the effects processor and the violin.  Doing this will prevent loud sounds that could damage your speakers or your ears, at least until appropriate levels are determined for future use.

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  5. Andre Donawa | The Alternative Quartet

    We have a new winner in the long-distance customer category! Andre Donawa, a violinist with The Alternative Quartet, flew here all the way from the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago to check out our extensive selection of electric violins!
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